Who We Are

The National Bowling Association, Inc. is a non-profit corporation organized in August 1939, in Detroit, Michigan, for the express purpose of encouraging Blacks to develop their skills in the game of Ten Pins. It was originally known as the “National Negro Bowling Association”; because at the time of its birth, Blacks and other Non-Caucasians were not permitted to belong to ABC or WIBC; due to certain restrictive clauses in their constitutions. Since our membership included a large number of Asians, Hispanics, Native Americans and people of color other than Black; in 1944 our organization was renamed, “The National Bowling Association, Inc.” We actively participated in the fight for “Equality in Bowling”; and in 1950, both ABC and WIBC removed the Non-Caucasian clauses from their constitutions. Since 1951,TNBA members have enjoyed the privilege of competing in all open sanctioned leagues and tournaments.

Our “Ongoing” Mission

TNBA’s constitution purpose has always been to foster and promote the game of Ten Pins amongst both men and women. Membership is open to all bowlers, without regard to race, creed or color. Although approximately 80% of our present membership is Black, TNBA has no racial restrictions whatsoever as to membership or participation. TNBA proudly stands behind its motto as a “Promoter of Sportsmanship, Fellowship and Friendship” – Ideals which are accomplished through organized competition. We also serve as a recruiting agency and point-of-entry for young bowlers; who otherwise would not receive the encouragement, tutelage and guidance needed to learn the game and develop the skills that are essential to full enjoyment and successful competition. Such encouragement and training prepares TNBA bowlers to compete on equal terms in the tournament and competitions of their choice.

TNBA has been and continues to be a major factor in the integration of blacks into the “bowling world” and plays a part in the national movement toward implementation of American democracy, ideals and principles. The acquaintance that comes with contact and the respect that is engendered by superior skill helps break down unfavorable attitudes and racial barriers.

Visit our History Pages:
A Hard Road To Glory
TNBA, The Early Years